Monday, November 28, 2011

HW Econ and WH HW Week of 28 November

Econ

Monday HW

1. p. 113, #29.

Tuesday HW

1. p. 113, #30.

Wednesday HW

1. p. 113, #31-32.

Thursday HW

1. p. 115, #1-3.

Friday HW

1. p. 116, #1-2.

WH

Monday

1. p. 388, History Through Architecture

Tuesday

1. Reading Check, Examining, p. 389.

Wednesday

1. Reading Check, Describing, p. 390.

Thursday

1. Picturing History, p. 390.

Friday HW

p. 391, History Through Art.

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Chapter 12 Section 3 National Unification and the National State

Prayer (alphabetical):

And, to anticipate further revolutionary developments, as a critique of capitalism, we will consider Karl Marx.

In fact, a major new series has been announced where American school children will learn about Marx in school.

Kids to Meet Marx in American Schools: A Tale of the History Channel and Hollywood.

Brian Jones, a New York teacher and actor, is a board member of VOICES and has also played the lead in Zinn’s play Marx in SoHo. Jones extols the benefits of this one man play as a tool to introduce people to Marx’s ideas.



Jones is also a regular contributor to Socialist Worker, International Socialist Review, and speaks regularly on the beneficial principles of Marxism, including this year at the 2009 Socialism Conference. He recently gave a speech on the failure of capitalism, proclaiming that “Marx is back.”


According to a Zinn Educational Project report, in April 2008, with support from an anonymous donor, ZEP partnered with 32 organizations to offer 31,000 teachers and teacher educators free packets for instilling the "people's history" in schools across the country. The ZEP reports it quickly received requests for its available 4,000 free packets, nearly half of which were sent to schools in California, New York and Illinois.

A graphic illustrating where ZEP sent the packets is below:




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Chapter 12 Section 3 National Unification and the National State
Unification occurred at different times and in different forms throughout Europe and in North America. The Crimean War destroyed the Concert of Europe. A defeated Russia retreated from European affairs, and Austria was isolated. Italian and German nationalists exploited Austria's isolation. Both gained important territory in the Austro-Prussian War and the Franco-Prussian War, and a unified Germany and Italy emerged. Growing prosperity and expanded voting rights helped Great Britain avoid revolution in 1848. In 1852, the French voted to restore their empire. Louis-Napoleon became the authoritarian Napoleon III and ruled until France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. Austria granted Hungarians the right to govern their own domestic affairs. In Russia, Czar Alexander II freed the serfs and instituted other reforms. When a radical assassinated him, his son, Alexander III, reverted to repressive rule. The United States endured a costly civil war to settle the conflict over slavery between the Northern and Southern states. After two short rebellions, Canada won its independence from Great Britain.

Main Ideas

The rise of nationalism contributed to the unification of Italy and Germany.

While nationalism had great appeal, not all people achieved the goal of establishing their own national states.

Key Terms

militarism

kaiser

plebiscite

emancipation

abolitionism

secede

Otto von Bismarck
Quotes from Bismarck



chancellor

Realpolitik

annex

Reich

Industrial Europe ca. 1850

Breakdown of the Concert of Europe
War and Civilization, Crimea, War, technology, and Industry, Blood & Iron



Reading Check

Explaining

How did the Crimean War destroy the Concert of Europe?

Italian Unification
Interactive Map Unifying Italy

For: Interactive timeline
Visit: PHSchool.com
Web Code: nap-2232

Reading Check

Explaining

How did Giuseppe Garibaldi contribute to Italian unification?

German Unification

Bismarck pictured greeting representatives at the Congress of Berlin.



Note Taking

Reading Skill: Recognize Sequence

Keep track of the sequence of events described in this section by completing a chart like the one below. List the causes that led to a strong German nation.






The Price of Nationalism Audio: Germany

The last half of the 1800s can be called the Age of Nationalism. By harnessing national feeling, European leaders fought ruthlessly to create strong, unified nations. Under Otto von Bismarck, Germany emerged as Europe’s most powerful empire—but at a considerable cost. In his 1870 diary, Crown Prince Friedrich wrote:

“[Germany had once been admired as a] nation of thinkers and philosophers, poets and artists, idealists and enthusiasts . . . [but now the world saw Germany as] a nation of conquerors and destroyers, to which no pledged word, no treaty, is sacred. . . . We are neither loved nor respected, but only feared.”
Bismarck: Germany From Blood and Iron (clip)


Blood and Iron: Audio

Otto von Bismarck succeeded where others had failed. Bismarck came from Prussia’s Junker (yoong kur) class, made up of conservative landowning nobles. Bismarck first served Prussia as a diplomat in Russia and France. In 1862, King William I made him prime minister. Within a decade, the new prime minister had become chancellor, or the highest official of a monarch, and had used his policy of “blood and iron” to unite the German states under Prussian rule.

Bismarck Unites Germany: Audio
Prussian legislators waited restlessly for Otto von Bismarck to speak. He wanted them to vote for more money to build up the army. Liberal members opposed the move. Bismarck rose and dismissed their concerns:

“Germany does not look to Prussia’s liberalism, but to her power. . . . The great questions of the day are not to be decided by speeches and majority resolutions—that was the mistake of 1848 and 1849—but by blood and iron!”

—Otto von Bismarck, 1862

Map

Unification of Germany, 1865–1871

Go Online
For: Audio guided tour
Visit: PHSchool.com
Web Code: nap-2211

1. Locate

To the East? West? Near what countries? Bodies of water, etc.

a) Prussia; b) Silesia; c) Bavaria; d) Schleswig

2. Region

What are did Prussia add to its territory in 1866?

3. Analyzing Information

Why do you think Austrian influence was greater among the southern German states than among the northern ones?

This map is titled “Unification of Germany, 1865 to 1871.” A circular image below the title to the right gives a global view of the map area.

The map extends north-south from Denmark and Sweden to the Mediterranean Sea. The map extends east-west from Russia to central France. A Key at the right shows the following shading and symbols: yellow shading; Prussia, 1865; light green shading, Added to Prussia, 1866; dark green shading, Added to form North German Confederation, 1867; orange shading, Added to form German empire, 1871; red line, Boundary of German empire, 1871;

red explosion symbol, Battle sites; orange arrow, Route of Prussian armies in Austro-Prussian War; and green arrow, Route of German armies in Franco-Prussian War.

The boundary of the German empire in 1871, indicated by a red line, borders the North Sea, Denmark, and the Baltic Sea in the north, Russia and Austria-Hungary in the east, Switzerland in the south, and France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands in the west. Prussia in 1865, shaded in yellow, includes the western province of Westphalia. Another large yellow-shaded area appears in the north and east. Brandenburg, including the city of Berlin, is in the center. The provinces of Pomerania, West Prussia, and East Prussia are in the northeast. Posen is in the East, and Silesia is in the southeast. Two other small yellow areas appear in the center. Another small yellow area, labeled Hohenzollern, appears in the south. The area added to Prussia in 1866, shaded in light green, includes the northwest area bordering the Netherlands and Denmark.

The province of Schleswig is in today’s southern Denmark. Holstein is south of Schleswig. The city of Hamburg and the province of Hanover are south of Holstein. Another light green area appears in the center. The cities of Ems, east of the Rhine River, and Frankfurt to the southeast are in this area. The area added to form the North German Confederation in 1867, shaded in dark green, appears in the north between the light green and yellow areas. It is labeled Mecklenburg. Another dark green area appears in the center on the Austria-Hungary border. The provinces of Thuringia and Saxony are in this area. Other green areas are scattered throughout the center. The area added to form the German empire in 1871, shaded in orange, includes southern Germany. Lorraine, including the city of Metz, and Alsace are in the west, bordering France. W├╝rttemberg is in the center, Baden is in the south, and Bavaria, including the city of Munich, is in the east. Orange arrows extend from the Saxony and Silesia regions across the Austria-Hungary border to Sadowa. A red battle symbol appears here. Green arrows extend from Lorraine, through Metz, across the French border to Sedan. A battle symbol appears here. The arrows extend westward toward Paris.

Learn

Focus Question

How did Otto von Bismarck, the Chancellor of Prussia, lead the drive for German unity?

Master of Realpolitik

Bismarck’s success was due in part to his strong will. He was a master of Realpolitik (ray ahl poh lee teek), or realistic politics based on the needs of the state. In the case of Realpolitik, power was more important than principles.

Although Bismarck was the architect of German unity, he was not really a German nationalist. His primary loyalty was to the Hohenzollerns (hoh un tsawl urnz), the ruling dynasty of Prussia, who represented a powerful, traditional monarchy. Through unification, he hoped to bring more power to the Hohenzollerns.

Royal house medal of the Hohenzollerns




Strengthening the Army

As Prussia’s prime minister, Bismarck first moved to build up the Prussian army. Despite his “blood and iron” speech, the liberal legislature refused to vote for funds for the military. In response, Bismarck strengthened the army with money that had been collected for other purposes. With a powerful, well-equipped military, he was then ready to pursue an aggressive foreign policy. Over the next decade, Bismarck led Prussia into three wars. Each war increased Prussian prestige and power and paved the way for German unity.

Prussia Declares War With Denmark and Austria

Bismarck’s first maneuver was to form an alliance in 1864 with Austria. Prussia and Austria then seized the provinces of Schleswig and Holstein from Denmark. After a brief war, Prussia and Austria “liberated” the two provinces and divided up the spoils. Austria was to administer Holstein and Prussia was to administer Schleswig.

In 1866, Bismarck invented an excuse to attack Austria. The Austro-Prussian War lasted just seven weeks and ended in a decisive Prussian victory. Prussia then annexed, or took control of, several other north German states.

Bismarck dissolved the Austrian-led German Confederation and created a new confederation dominated by Prussia. He allowed Austria and four other southern German states to remain independent. Bismarck’s motives, as always, were strictly practical. “We had to avoid leaving behind any desire for revenge,” he later wrote.

Primary Source

War and Power

In 1866, Field Marshal Helmuth von Moltke analyzed the importance of Prussia’s war against Austria. Why, according to von Moltke, did Prussia go to war against Austria?

Primary Source

“The war of 1866 was entered on not because the existence of Prussia was threatened, nor was it caused by public opinion and the voice of the people; it was a struggle, long foreseen and calmly prepared for, recognized as a necessity by the Cabinet, not for territorial expansion, for an extension of our domain, or for material advantage, but for an ideal end—the establishment of power. Not a foot of land was exacted from Austria. . . . Its center of gravity lay out of Germany; Prussia’s lay within it. Prussia felt itself called upon and strong enough to assume the leadership of the German races.”

France Declares War on Prussia

In France, the Prussian victory over Austria angered Napoleon III. A growing rivalry between the two nations led to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870.
Franco-Prussian War (1870)



The causes of the Franco-Prussian War are rooted in the shifting balance of power in Europe after the Napoleonic wars. France and Prussia had fought against each other, with France beating Prussia in 1806, then losing in 1813-1815. In the following decades, Prussia was generally considered by the French as a modern, enlightened country. Republicans particularly favoured the prospect of seeing the German nation unite under Prussian leadership, displacing the old, catholic Austrian empire. Prussia hold similar views, but cultivated an image of France as the hereditary enemy: Prussia was to replace Austria as the head of Germany, and to replace France as the leader in continental Europe.

Napoleon III became emperor in France thanks to a coup in 1851. He initially supported the German unification policy of Otto von Bismarck, chancellor of Prussia under king Wilhelm I. It was only after the Austro-Prussian war of 1866 that France began to worry about the fast-rising Prussian power. To be able to face the Prussian conscription-based army, military reform was debated in the French parliament, but refused by the Left which considered there was no danger of war.

In July 1870, a diplomatic crisis broke, Bismarck managed to provoke the French into declaring war to Prussia — and French diplomacy fell in the trap.

Germans recalled only too well the invasions of Napoleon I some 60 years earlier. Bismarck played up the image of the French menace to spur German nationalism. For his part, Napoleon III did little to avoid war, hoping to mask problems at home with military glory.

Bismarck furthered the crisis by rewriting and then releasing to the press a telegram that reported on a meeting between King William I and the French ambassador. Bismarck’s editing of the “Ems dispatch” made it seem that William I had insulted the Frenchman. Furious, Napoleon III declared war on Prussia, as Bismarck had hoped.

Vocabulary Builder

edit—(ed it) v. to make additions, deletions, or other changes to a piece of writing

A superior Prussian force, supported by troops from other German states, smashed the badly organized and poorly supplied French soldiers. Napoleon III, old and ill, surrendered within a few weeks. France had to accept a humiliating peace.

France had a good professional army, which was indeed able to face the Prussians. But a decisive strategic surprise came when all German states took side with Prussia: The French were overwhelmed, outmaneuvered and, in spite of ferocious combats, finally beaten. After Sept. 4th, the new Republic refused to sign an armistice, managed to hastily improvise "armies" out of civilian volunteers, but these were no match for the well-trained Prussians. The war ended when Parisians, besieged, bombarded and starved, surrendered.

The Prussian Army held a brief victory parade in Paris on 17 February, 1871, and Bismarck honoured the armistice by sending trainloads of food into Paris and moving Prussian forces to the east of the city. Prussian armies would occupy parts of France until the French completed the payment of a five-billion francs war indemnity. Then, they would withdraw to Alsace and Lorraine. An exodus occurred from Paris as some 200,000 people, predominantly middle-class, left the city for the countryside. Paris was quickly re-supplied with free food and fuel by the United Kingdom and several accounts recall life in the city settling back to normal.

The war ended up with a complete triumph for Prussia, whose king was proclaimed emperor of Germany in the palace of Versailles — a supreme humiliation of the French and a Prussian revenge on Napoleon's victorious march in Berlin.
The Treaty of Frankfurt gave Germany Alsace and the northern portion of Lorraine (Moselle), where Germanic dialects were spoken by parts of the population. Most importantly, Germany now possessed Metz, a key fortified stronghold between the two countries. Part of the Alsacians refused to live under German rule and emigrated to "inner France".

The loss of this territory was a source of resentment in France for years to come, and revanchism even inspired an attempted coup in Paris in the 1880s. Yet, by 1900, new generations tended to consider it old history, while Alsacians adapted more or less reluctantly to German rule [see Barr├Ęs "Au service de l'Allemagne"]. No French political party put forward a reconquest of Alsace-Lorraine in its program. Compensations were found in colonization abroad. When World War I broke out, the French mobilized with the idea to defend their territory as it was, not to take back Alsace-Lorraine, as soldiers' diaries and letters indicate.

Had Germany not taken the option of war in 1914, its successful path paved by the 1870 triumph would have led it to become peacefully the uncontested leader in Europe.



Checkpoint

What techniques did Bismarck use to unify the German states?

Birth of the German Empire: Audio

Delighted by the victory over France, princes from the southern German states and the North German Confederation persuaded William I of Prussia to take the title kaiser (ky zur), or emperor. In January 1871, German nationalists celebrated the birth of the Second Reich, or empire. They called it that because they considered it heir to the Holy Roman Empire.

A constitution drafted by Bismarck set up a two-house legislature. The Bundesrat (boon dus raht), or upper house, was appointed by the rulers of the German states. The Reichstag (ryks tahg), or lower house, was elected by universal male suffrage. Because the Bundesrat could veto any decisions of the Reichstag, real power remained in the hands of the emperor and his chancellor.

Checkpoint

How was the new German government, drafted by Bismarck, structured?

The New German Empire

Audio

In 1870, German historian Heinrich von Treitschke (vawn trych kuh) wrote a newspaper article demanding the annexation of Alsace and Lorraine from France. A year later, annexation became a condition of the peace settlement in the Franco-­Prussian War:

“The sense of justice to Germany demands the lessening of France. . . . These territories are ours by the right of the sword, and . . . [by] virtue of a higher right—the right of the German nation, which will not permit its lost children to remain strangers to the German Empire.”

Learn

Focus Question

How did Germany increase its power after unifying in 1871?

In January 1871, German princes gathered in the glittering Hall of Mirrors at the French palace of Versailles. They had just defeated Napoleon III in the Franco-Prussian War. Once home to French kings, the palace seemed the perfect place to proclaim the new German empire. To the winners as well as to the losers, the symbolism was clear: French domination of Europe had ended. Germany was now the dominant power in Europe.

Reading Check

Summarizing

What events led to German unification?

A Political Game of Chess

This political cartoon shows Otto von Bismarck and Pope Pius IX trying to checkmate each other in a game of chess.

1. How does this cartoon reflect the relationship between Bismarck and the Catholic Church?

2. How did the conflict between church and state affect German politics in the 1870s?

On the domestic front, Bismarck applied the same ruthless methods he had used to achieve unification. The Iron Chancellor, as he was called, sought to erase local loyalties and crush all opposition to the imperial state. He targeted two groups—the Catholic Church and the Socialists. In his view, both posed a threat to the new German state.

Crankshaw, one of Bismarck's biographers, describes the tragedy of Bismarck. It is not that he "subordinated morality to the supposed needs of the state," many politicians do that; it is that "his countrymen surrendered to the principle (pp. 413-414)."

The German people saw it happening and lacked the will to stop it. Bismarck and the people each corrupted the other. To say that Bismarck was a direct precursor of Hitler is evidently untrue; but it is not untrue, I think, to say that those aspects of the German character which made it possible for Bismarck to rule for just on thirty years were those same aspects which made it too easy for a Hitler to take power and keep it (p. 414).



Nationalism and Reform in Europe

Great Britain

France

The Austrian Empire

Russia
Although serfdom had almost disappeared in Western Europe by the 1700s, it survived in Russia. Masters exercised almost total power over their serfs. A noble turned revolutionary described the treatment of the serfs:

“I heard . . . stories of men and women torn from their families and their villages, and sold, or lost in gambling, or exchanged for a couple of hunting dogs, and then transported to some remote part of Russia to create a [master’s] new estate; of children taken from their parents and sold to cruel . . . masters.”

—Peter Kropotkin, Memoirs of a Revolutionist


Learn

Focus Question

Why did industrialization and reform come more slowly to Russia than to Western Europe?
Reading Check

Examining

How was Great Britain able to avoid a revolution in 1848?

Nationalism in the United States



Graphic Notes: "Downfall of Mother Bank," depicting President Andrew Jackson holding up an "Order of the Removal of the Public Money" during the fight over the Bank of the United States, 1833. E.W. Clay lithograph.

Citation: American Antiquarian Society, 185 Salisbury St, Worcester, MA 01609-1634 and the Library of Congress.

Nicholas Biddle was the president of the Bank of the United States during the Bank War of 1832. Biddle held a great deal of unwarranted power over the nation’s finances, which President Jackson resented. When Jackson vetoed a bill to renew the Bank’s charter, Biddle agreed with Senator Henry Clay that this would hurt him in the upcoming presidential election of 1832, but both of them were proven wrong. When Jackson tried to end the bank by withdrawing deposits, Biddle caused a financial panic to try and prevent Jackson from attaining the presidency which failed when Jackson was re-elected.
The Bank War began with Senators Noah Webster and Clay with their Recharter Bill: Clay and Webster presented Congress with a Recharter Bill for the Bank of the United States in 1832. Although four years before the charter would expire, Clay hoped to make the Bank an issue in the upcoming presidential election, which he hoped to win. Clay hoped to quickly pass the Bill in Congress, then send it to the White House to be signed by Jackson. Clay knew Jackson would most likely veto the bill, alienating the elite in the upcoming election, therefore favoring Clay. Jackson did veto the bill, but contrary to Clay’s expectation, gained popular public support for his statement.

The “Pet” banks where surplus federal funds were placed after the closing of the Bank of the United States. The banks were chosen for their support of president Jackson and soon flooded the country with paper money as there was no longer a central, federal finance institution. As a result of the massive amounts of paper money, inflation skyrocketed, and Jackson was forced to try to slow inflation with his Specie Circular.

The Specie Circular (1836) was decreed by Jackson which stated that all public lands had to be purchased with “hard” money, gold or silver. Jackson took this measure to slow the runaway inflation caused by his closure of the Bank of the United States.

Reading Check

Explaining

How did the election of Andrew Jackson influence American politics?
The divisions between Americans eventually led to fighting in the Civil War.

You can learn more about music from the period by listening to:
"When Johnny Comes Marching Home." In this exercise you can 1) view the exhibit; 2) read the lyrics; 3) learn more; and, 4) rewrite the song.

The Emergence of a Canadian Nation

Reading Check

Describing

How did the British North American Act change the government of Canada?

Map: The Dominion of Canada in the Nineteenth Century

A novel about the Crimean War:

Master George by Beryl Bainbridge

Visit an interactive exhibit about the gold rush.

The American Civil War.

Everyday life of a Civil War soldier

Civil War diary accounts

The Civil War: A Film by Ken Burns

Short animated movie about the American Civil War


New holiday feature: keep Christ in Christmas

Brother Ray performing at the Monastery Of Ettal in Germany 1979


I´ll be home for Christmas-Fats Domino



HW email to gmsmith@shanahan.org
Tuesday HW

You can be informed of the 48 hour locked Test/Quiz page by following me as gmicksmith on Twitter. Sign up today.

1. How did the Crimean War destroy the Concert of Europe?

2. How did Giuseppe Garibaldi contribute to Italian unification?

Wednesday HW

Unification of Germany, 1865–1871

Go Online
For: Audio guided tour
Visit: PHSchool.com
Web Code: nap-2211

1. Locate

To the East? West? Near what countries? Bodies of water, etc.

a) Prussia; b) Silesia; c) Bavaria; d) Schleswig

2. Region

What are did Prussia add to its territory in 1866?

3. Analyzing Information

Why do you think Austrian influence was greater among the southern German states than among the northern ones?

Thursday HW
1. How did Otto von Bismarck, the Chancellor of Prussia, lead the drive for German unity?

2. What techniques did Bismarck use to unify the German states?

3. How was the new German government, drafted by Bismarck, structured?

4. How did Germany increase its power after unifying in 1871?

5. What events led to German unification?

Friday HW



A Political Game of Chess

This political cartoon shows Otto von Bismarck and Pope Pius IX trying to checkmate each other in a game of chess.

1. How does this cartoon reflect the relationship between Bismarck and the Catholic Church?

2. How did the conflict between church and state affect German politics in the 1870s?

3. Why did industrialization and reform come more slowly to Russia than to Western Europe?

4. How was Great Britain able to avoid a revolution in 1848?

5. How did the election of Andrew Jackson influence American politics?

6. How did the British North American Act change the government of Canada?

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Honors World History II, Fall 2011, Test Chapter 10

TestCh10

2nd Period

Number of Grades 31
Range of Grades (81% - 98%)
Mean 91.2%
Median 93%
Mode 95%

Grade Distribution by Grouping

%
0 - 9
10 - 19
20 - 29
30 - 39
40 - 49
50 - 59
60 - 69
70 - 79
80 - 89 11 Assessment(s) (11)
90 - 99 20 Assessment(s) (20)

Grade Distribution of each Grade

%
81 2 Assessment(s) (2)
82
83
84 1 Assessment(s) (1)
85
86 3 Assessment(s) (3)
87
88 5 Assessment(s) (5)
89
90
91 3 Assessment(s) (3)
92
93 5 Assessment(s) (5)
94
95 10 Assessment(s) (10)
96
97
98 2 Assessment(s) (2)

TestCh10

5th Period

Number of Grades 33
Range of Grades (79% - 95%)
Mean 90.5%
Median 91%
Mode 93%

Grade Distribution by Grouping

%
0 - 9
10 - 19
20 - 29
30 - 39
40 - 49
50 - 59
60 - 69
70 - 79 3 Assessment(s) (3)
80 - 89 6 Assessment(s) (6)
90 - 99 24 Assessment(s) (24)

Grade Distribution of each Grade

%
79 3 Assessment(s) (3)
80
81
82
83
84 1 Assessment(s) (1)
85
86 3 Assessment(s) (3)
87
88 2 Assessment(s) (2)
89
90
91 8 Assessment(s) (8)
92
93 9 Assessment(s) (9)
94
95 7 Assessment(s) (7)

TestCh10

8th Period

Number of Grades 31
Range of Grades (72% - 98%)
Mean 88%
Median 88%
Mode 84%

Grade Distribution by Grouping

%
0 - 9
10 - 19
20 - 29
30 - 39
40 - 49
50 - 59
60 - 69
70 - 79 2 Assessment(s) (2)
80 - 89 15 Assessment(s) (15)
90 - 99 14 Assessment(s) (14)

Grade Distribution of each Grade

%
72 1 Assessment(s) (1)
73
74
75
76
77
78
79 1 Assessment(s) (1)
80
81 3 Assessment(s) (3)
82
83
84 6 Assessment(s) (6)
85
86 4 Assessment(s) (4)
87
88 2 Assessment(s) (2)
89
90
91 3 Assessment(s) (3)
92
93 5 Assessment(s) (5)
94
95 5 Assessment(s) (5)
96
97
98 1 Assessment(s) (1)

Honors Business Economics, Fall 2011, Test Chapter 1

TestChapter1

Number of Grades 23
Range of Grades (77% - 98%)
Mean 86.5%
Median 86%
Mode 84%

Grade Distribution by Grouping

%
0 - 9
10 - 19
20 - 29
30 - 39
40 - 49
50 - 59
60 - 69
70 - 79 2 Assessment(s) (2)
80 - 89 15 Assessment(s) (15)
90 - 99 6 Assessment(s) (6)

Grade Distribution of each Grade

%
77 1 Assessment(s) (1)
78
79 1 Assessment(s) (1)
80
81 2 Assessment(s) (2)
82
83
84 7 Assessment(s) (7)
85
86 4 Assessment(s) (4)
87
88 2 Assessment(s) (2)
89
90
91 2 Assessment(s) (2)
92
93 1 Assessment(s) (1)
94
95 2 Assessment(s) (2)
96
97
98 1 Assessment(s) (1)

Honors Business Economics, Fall 2011, Test Chapter 2

TestChapter2

Number of Grades 22
Range of Grades (63% - 97%)
Mean 88.1%
Median 89%
Mode 86%

Grade Distribution by Grouping

%
0 - 9
10 - 19
20 - 29
30 - 39
40 - 49
50 - 59
60 - 69 1 Assessment(s) (1)
70 - 79
80 - 89 12 Assessment(s) (12)
90 - 99 9 Assessment(s) (9)

Grade Distribution of each Grade

%
63 1 Assessment(s) (1)
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80 1 Assessment(s) (1)
81
82
83 1 Assessment(s) (1)
84
85
86 6 Assessment(s) (6)
87
88
89 4 Assessment(s) (4)
90
91 4 Assessment(s) (4)
92
93
94 3 Assessment(s) (3)
95
96
97 2 Assessment(s) (2)